first_imgAugust is National Gastroparesis Awareness Month! (healthline.com).What is it?Gastroparesis is a condition in which the motility in your stomach is slowed down or stopped, preventing the stomach from emptying properly, (mayoclinic.org).What changes should you make to your diet? Eat smaller meals more frequentlyChew food thoroughlyLow-fat foodsSoups/pureed foodsDrink lots of waterExercise gently after you eat (aka walk)Avoid carbonated drinks, alcohol, and smokingAvoid laying down after a meal (mayoclinic.org)Recommended foods:Starches – white bread, plain bagels, pancakes, white crackers, rice, and crackersProtein – lean beef, veal, and pork, chicken or turkey (no skin), crab, lobster, shrimp and oysters, tuna (in water), eggs, tofuF/V – carrots, beets, and mushrooms (cooked), fruit juices, applesauce, bananas, peaches and pears (canned)Dairy – milk, yogurt, custard, and pudding Are there medications to help? Metoclopramide (Reglan) – used to treat conditions of the stomach and intestines, for short-term use. For gastroparesis, it can help with symptoms of nausea and vomiting (webmd.com)Domperidone – medicine that increases the movements or contractions of the stomach and bowel, used to treat nausea and vomiting (mayoclinic.org)New research/medicine for gastroparesis:If patients do not respond to diet changes and medication for gastroparesis they can opt to do a surgical procedure called gastric electrical stimulation for severe cases of gastroparesis. This, in addition, can help diabetic gastroparesis patients by helping to maintain normal blood glucose levels. The implantable pulse generator and two intramuscular electrodes, which are inserted into the muscular layer of the stomach (Kadirkamanathan, S.S., Wingate, D.S., Epstein, O., Winsler, M., MacPherson, M., Fullarlon, G., 2004) help to activate the vagal afferent pathways to influence the central control mechanisms for nausea and vomiting (Wo, JM., Nowak, TV., Waseem S., Ward, MP, 2016).Resources:Drugs & Medications. Webmd.com. https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-8679/metoclopramide-oral/details. Published 2018. Accessed July 24, 2018.Gastroparesis – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic. Mayoclinic.org. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/gastroparesis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355792. Published 2018. Accessed July 24, 2018.Gastroparesis Diet: Foods to Avoid, Foods to Eat, and Recipes. Healthline. https://www.healthline.com/health/gastroparesis/gastroparesis-diet#foods-to-eat. Published 2018. Accessed July 24, 2018.Healthline: Medical information and health advice you can trust. Healthline.com. https://www.healthline.com/. Published 2018. Accessed July 24, 2018.Kadirkamanathan S, Wingate D, Epstein O, Winsler M, MacPherson M, Fullarlon G. GASTRIC ELECTRICAL STIMULATION (GES) FOR SEVERE GASTROPARESIS–INTERIM RESULTS FROM A UK REGISTRY. Gut [serial online]. April 2, 2004;53:A29. Available from: Complementary Index, Ipswich, MA. Accessed July 24, 2018.Wo J, Nowak T, Waseem S, Ward M. Gastric Electrical Stimulation for Gastroparesis and Chronic Unexplained Nausea and Vomiting. Curr Treat Options Gastroenterol. 2016;14(4):386-400. doi:10.1007/s11938-016-0103-1last_img