first_imgAPTN National NewsThunder Bay, Ont., is considered a hub for as many as 49 First Nations in northern Ontario.It’s where many communities send their kids to get a high school education.Sadly, it is also where seven kids have died as a result of moving away from home.In 2007, the issue was brought to national attention after the sixth death.An inquest was called into Reggie Bushie’s death, but it has yet to begin.As APTN National News reporter Tiar Wilson shows us, there is fear that more lives could be lost.last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsWINNIPEG-Charges against a Winnipeg hospital and an emergency room staff member are reportedly looming after a year-long police investigation into the death of Brian Sinclair, a wheelchair bound double-amputee Aboriginal man who died after spending 34 hours waiting to see a doctor.It is now up to Manitoba’s Crown attorney’s office to decide whether to go ahead with the charges, according to a report in the Winnipeg Free Press.Winnipeg police, however, issued a statement Wednesday morning denying the report. The police statement said the investigation had not yet been concluded.“This investigation has not been concluded and a report has not been forwarded to Manitoba Justice,” said the police statement.On Sept. 21, 2008, Sinclair, 45, was found dead in the emergency room of Winnipeg’s Health Sciences Centre from a bladder infection. All he needed was a catheter change and antibiotics to deal with the infection.An inquest has already been called in Sinclair’s death. Criminal charges would more than likely delay the start of that inquiry which has already been delayed due to the police investigation.Quoting a Manitoba justice source, the Winnipeg Free Press reported that police recommended a charge of criminal negligence causing death against an emergency room employee and a charge of failing to provide the necessities of life against the Health Sciences Centre.last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsVANCOUVER–Six new charges have been leveled against convicted sex offender Martin Tremblay.Vancouver police Sgt. Peter Thiessen said Tremblay had been charged with two counts of criminal negligence causing death, two counts of failing to provide the necessities of life and two counts of obstruction.The charges stem from the March 2010 deaths of Kayla Lalonde, 16, and Martha Hernandez, 17.Hernandez died after being taken out of Tremblay’s house in an ambulance.Lalonde was found dead on a street in Burnaby, B.C.Both were at a party at Tremblay’s residence.Tremblay was convicted of five counts of sexual assault in 2002.He served 14 months in jail.last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsA senior Chief in BC is warning of civil disobedience if the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline is approved.The proposed pipeline would cross Northern BC bringing bitumen from Alberta’s tar sands to ships on the west coast.But as APTN’s Rob Smith tells us, some First Nations leaders are warning the project could spark the kind of opposition seen at Oka and Ipperwash.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe live broadcast of the Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Awards are just a few hours away.In Winnipeg, crews have been busy setting up the big event now in its seventh year airing Friday evening on APTN. In fact, over a 1,000 man hours will have gone into it the production for the big night.Organizers say the show and talent have grown each year.APTN National News reporter Meagan Fiddler was there Thursday to get a sneak peek into what goes into Canada’s largest Aboriginal music awards show. She quickly gets a little help from Lorne Cardinal who steals the microphone and takes APTN behind the scenes.last_img read more

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first_imgLucy Scholey APTN NewsThe National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls publicly heard from a former First Nation chief for the first time Thursday, as she testified about the sexism, bullying and intimidation she faced as a leader.Adrienne Anichinapeo, who spent eight years in politics in the small Anicinape community of Kitcisakik, about 130 kilometres south of Val d’Or, said she wanted to tackle issues like a lack of running water and electricity. But she told the inquiry she faced problems from within her own band and often felt she was ignored.“We are very far from accepting a woman can lead a community,” she said, adding she was not respected in her position like the men who preceded her.She lost the election in August 2017 and has been trying to find a job within the community since.“The conditions in our community have not changed,” she said, adding that she has to drive for an hour out of town to do laundry. In the winter, she said her children have to leave the house to shower.Viviane Michel, president of Quebec Native Women Inc., told APTN that women in many Quebec First Nations face barriers to political work. The Innu community of Mingan, Que. is the only First Nation out of Quebec’s 44 Indigenous communities that has mandated gender parity on its council, she said.The solution is not setting a quota for women on council, but educating all First Nations members and encouraging more women to step up and run in elections, she said.Francyne Joe, president of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, said Indigenous women in leadership roles across the country often face sexism, violence, racism and bullying.“We work in a patriarchal system that is built on years of colonization which has disrupted our roles as leaders in our communities,” she said in an emailed statement.Commissioner Michèle Audette said the inquiry has heard similar testimonies from Indigenous women in leadership positions, but during private hearings.“We needed to hear that. Canada needs to hear that,” she said. “Our communities especially need to hear that.”On Thursday, the inquiry focused on survivors of violence. Anichinapeo said she experienced sexual violence growing up. When she lost the Kitcisakik election last August, she accepted it but suddenly found herself without work for the first time in her life. That’s when her troubled past caught up to her. Her story is one of many in her community, she said.“I look at the parents and children who live there and I see their misery.”More than 70 survivors and family members are expected to testify publicly or privately at the inquiry in Montreal this week. The hearings wrap up Friday.last_img read more

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first_imgInstead she puzzles over the dashcam video obtained by APTN that shows Brittany wandering about three kilometres near where she was eventually found dead.“She’s wearing shoes in the video,” said Frank.Police have studied more dashcam video and interviewed more people. But not the boyfriend, said Dolly.She’s in touch with police regularly, she added, and prays they keep investigating.“Someone has to have seen something or knows something,” she said.“I don’t want her death to be swept under the rug.”Merritt RCMP can be reached by calling 1-250-378-4262.  kmartens@aptn.ca@katmarte (Smudging at the site of Brittany Martel’s memorial. Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)Kathleen MartensAPTN NewsIt would have been a lonely place to die.Here on the side of a busy highway in the south-central interior of British Columbia.Brittany Martel’s body unnoticed by thousands of commuters and semi drivers who travel the Coquihalla daily.“I stand here and I ask myself, ‘What happened to her?’” said Roberta Moses, as she surveyed the steep embankment behind the memorial she made.“What happened to her shoes?”All good questions that no one can answer at this time.RCMP are awaiting results of toxicology tests taken by the B.C. Coroners Service.They, along with everyone else, hope to learn more because there were no visible signs of trauma on the 27-year-old’s body.Brittany – known as Bree to her friends – could have been in the ditch near Mine Creek Forest Road for up to five days, police said.She may have died there, alongside the highway litter, hubcaps and retreads.Or she may been dumped there.“It would have been her birthday September 16,” said Anna Thomas who burned sage at the memorial Wednesday.“I feel her spirit has left this place.”Thomas is president of the B.C. Native Women’s Association and used to manage the Royal Bank branch in Merritt.She and association secretary Gayle Frank drove down from the Kamloops to join Moses in saying a prayer and leaving an offering of water.“This is in the middle of nowhere,” observed Frank as she scanned the thick forest on either side of the highway.“Someone would have driven her here. You can’t walk here.”(A woman’s hair barrette lies on Mine Creek Forrest Road. (Photo Kathleen Martens/APTN)It was a shock when Brittany’s body was discovered July 22.A motorist spotted her while stretching his legs after police closed the road south of Merritt for an unrelated accident.No one was looking for her. At least not this time.She was the subject of a missing persons bulletin a month earlier in June 2018 after her family contacted RCMP.But she arrived home safely July 3.“Her cellphone wasn’t working and her dad sent her money,” said aunt Dolly Martel from Yellowknife.Two days later Brittany headed south again with two other women.“I miss her,” added Dolly, a sister to Brittany’s mother.“She was more like a daughter to me than a niece.”(The Coquihalla Highway cuts through stunning scenery. (Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)115 kms to next serviceTwo road signs warn motorists to gas up before leaving Merritt, a town that’s a major transportation service hub in the Nicola Valley.Otherwise they may find themselves needing to turn around where Brittany’s body was found – about 20 minutes outside Merritt.The exit at Mine Creek Forest Road takes drivers under and around the freeway.It’s the site of some activity: graffiti is painted on the asphalt, food wrappers blow in the breeze, and a woman’s hair barrette lies broken in two pieces.A group of mourners found a pair of women’s panties at the scene.Were they Brittany’s?Dolly knows about the find two weeks after Brittany’s body was discovered and said police do, too.She said police did recover Brittany’s shoulder bag and phone and returned them to her family.Sometimes, she admitted, she calls the number just to hear Brittany’s voice.“My mission is to go to the place where Brit was found,” she said.“I made a promise at the funeral to drive that road; to find out what happened.”(A welcome sign outside Merritt, B.C. (Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)Moses didn’t know Brittany but took part in the vigil that drew an estimated 40 people.She said the group formed in a Merritt park, marched to the front of the RCMP detachment and wound its way up a hill to the grounds of an Indigenous college.“We left posters of Brittany outside the (detachment),” she said.“Two hours later they were gone. That’s a show of disrespect by the RCMP.”Moses said Brittany joins a list of unsolved deaths involving missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada.She said nearly a dozen people revealed during the vigil they – like Brittany’s family – lost relatives under suspicious circumstances.“My great niece was found face down in a slough in Edmonton 1999,” added Moses, tears springing from her eyes at the memory.“She was missing a shoe and her fingernails were broken; she fought like hell.”But there was never a criminal case.“Take a look at this vast country,” she added.“How many of our people – our women – are out there?”Frank lost a younger sister in a fire outside Kamloops in 2009.She said police labelled it “accidental” even though her sibling was inside a trailer in a bad part of town.“She was burned alive by accident,” said Frank.“So many women and men are unaccounted for.”(The RCMP detachment in Merritt, B.C. (Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)Together they list the names of half a dozen well-known and not so well-known cases of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls from the Kamloops, Merritt and Hope, B.C. areas.Communities that see heavy traffic thanks to their location on major routes and a high volume of strangers.‘No criminality suspected’People from Merritt to Brittany’s Dene community of K’atl’odeeche or Hay River First Nation were dismayed when police announced “no criminality is suspected” in her death.“How is that not suspicious that she wound up in a ditch?” asked Thomas.“Without any shoes.”This time Brittany had a ride.She usually got around the interior and lower mainland of B.C. by hitchhiking – a common form of transportation in the North where not everyone can afford a vehicle and there are no public buses.Though she loved her family, home was a place she increasingly escaped.“I feel like road kill haha on this highway again,” she wrote July 15.The next post is a photo her sister snapped only days before her final journey. Her hair is shades of red and blonde – as if she likes both colours equally.It’s the picture Moses laminated to use at the memorial – a small island to Brittany’s death amid the stunning scenery.“I don’t think there will ever be closure until we find out exactly what happened,” Moses said.“How did she end up dead on the side of a major highway? What did she experience in her final hour?“I pray for justice to be done one day soon.”Dolly hopes her niece didn’t suffer.She said Brittany’s boyfriend from Edmonton was a long-time drug user and got the young woman “into heavy stuff.”He owed money and fled violence in NWT, Dolly said, and Brittany went after him.“She was a happy-go-lucky party girl. Not into the junkie lifestyle he showed her.”The women she travelled with on that last ride were also involved with drugs, Dolly said.“The police questioned (the driver) for three hours…She dropped the other passenger off in Brooks, Alta., and kept going with Brittany.“She said they drove all night but were so tired (they) pulled over to the side of the road…where she’d fallen asleep.(A view of the Coquihalla Highway from Mine Creek Forest Road. Photo: Kathleen Martens/APTN)Dolly starts crying now.“When she woke up she said that Bree was gone. That she drove back and forth looking for Brittany.“But didn’t go to police.”Holly said drugs – and those women – have hurt a lot of people.And those women haven’t been back to NWT.“They called each other ‘friends’,” said Dolly. “There have been condolences, no answers.”This is the longest Dolly has gone without speaking to Brittany, who is buried next to her stillborn son.A loss Dolly said her niece hadn’t recovered from.She said Brittany was a natural mom, the oldest looking after five siblings while her parents struggled with alcohol addiction.“They looked up to her. She bathed and fed them. They are lost without her.”Dolly herself kicked cocaine “cold turkey” – something she said Brittany admired.“She told me, ‘Auntie, I want a better life.’”Yet she became another crime statistic.Collateral damage in the drug trade.And a checkmark in the grievances Moses said Indigenous people count living under non-Indigenous police and courts.“There is mistrust of the RCMP,” she said.During a lull in traffic noise, Moses said coming to the memorial doesn’t bring her peace.last_img read more

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first_imgTORONTO – CN Rail says it plans to invest about $315 million in Ontario this year to expand and strengthen the company’s rail network across the province.The company says planned projects include upgrades at CN’s intermodal terminal in Brampton northwest of Toronto — the company’s largest such facility — and the construction of a new train passing siding east of Sioux LookoutThe company also plans to replace some 145 kilometres of rail, install more than 380,000 new railroad ties and rebuilds some 60 road crossing surfaces.CN says it will also perform maintenance work on bridges, culverts, signal systems and other track infrastructureThe Ontario investments are part of CN’s $3.4 billion capital program for 2018, which include a new train passing siding in the company’s corridor linking Toronto and Winnipeg.“We are investing for the long haul with these projects to boost capacity and network resiliency to meet growing demand across our economy,” said CN Eastern Region vice-president Michael Farkouh.“Our substantial investments to renew our existing railway infrastructure underscores our commitment to operating safely..”Companies in this story: (TSX:CNR)last_img read more

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first_imgDETROIT – As General Motors reported a healthy $2.5 billion third-quarter profit, the Detroit automaker ramped up its cost-cutting efforts by offering buyouts to 18,000 white-collar workers.The company, while acknowledging it’s in good shape now, said Wednesday it needs to be smaller to prepare for tougher times that might be ahead as it continues to get ready for a future of electric and autonomous vehicles.“Even with the progress we’ve made, we are taking proactive steps to get ahead of the curve by accelerating our efforts to address overall business performance,” GM said in a statement. “We are doing this while our company and economy are strong.”The earnings and buyout news drove GM shares higher in Wednesday afternoon trading. The stock was up 8.6 per cent to $36.43, after mostly falling since June.Buyout offers were made Wednesday to salaried workers in North America with 12 or more years of service. GM spokesman Patrick Morrissey wouldn’t say whether the company has a target number for employee reductions, nor would he say if there will be layoffs if too few employees take the buyouts.“We will evaluate the need to implement after we see the results of the voluntary program and other cost reduction efforts,” he said.Workers have until Nov. 19 to make a decision, and they would leave the company by the end of the year, GM said. The company has 50,000 salaried workers in North America.The offers came as GM’s earnings surprised Wall Street by riding strong prices for much of its model lineup across the globe, especially in the U.S. where it rolled out redesigned versions of its Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickups.“Our discipline came through this quarter,” Chief Financial Officer Dhivya Suryadevara said, adding that she believes strong prices are sustainable as GM builds inventory of light-duty pickups and rolls out heavy-duty versions.The average sale price of a GM vehicle in the U.S. reached $36,000, $800 more than a year ago and a third-quarter record.Even as auto sales started to ebb in the U.S., China and elsewhere, GM said it earned $1.75 per share. Excluding one-time items, the company made $1.87, far exceeding analyst projections of $1.25 per share, according to a survey by FactSet.Revenue jumped 6.4 per cent to $35.8 billion, also topping forecasts. The company was resilient in a declining Chinese market, where it posted record third-quarter income of $500 million from July through September. And its pretax profit in North America, its most lucrative market, rose 33 per cent to $2.8 billion with a profit margin of 10.2 per cent.GM also gave a more optimistic forecast for the full year, saying it expects pretax profits at the high end of its previous guidance of $5.80 to $6.20 per share as it rolls out the new pickups and does its best to battle higher commodity costs.GM’s global retail sales to individuals, on the other hand, dropped 15 per cent during the quarter, to 1.98 million vehicles. But sales to dealers, the point at which GM books revenue, rose 4.5 per cent, to 1.13 million.GM was hit once again by costs associated with its giant recall for faulty ignition switches. The company posted a $440 million charge as it updated estimated costs for legal claims.A year ago, GM posted a $3 billion net loss due to a $5.4 billion charge for selling Opel and Vauxhall to France’s PSA Group.The strong quarter is a result of GM executing well on its game plan, said Edward Jones Industrials Analyst Jeff Windau.“If you’re selling vehicles that have higher price points, you’re able to offset some of those negative headwinds from the commodity prices,” he said.Windau was cautious about GM’s prospects in the long term, rating the company’s shares “hold” due to the risk of rising interest rates, higher commodity prices and the potential that rising gas prices could cut into pickup truck sales.Suryadevara said GM expects tariff-driven commodity price increases to cost the company $1 billion this year, $400 million in the third quarter alone. The Trump administration has imposed 10 per cent tariffs on imported aluminum and 25 per cent on steel.GM reported that its Cruise Automation autonomous vehicle unit spent $200 million during the quarter and said spending likely will rise as the unit heads toward rolling out a self-driving ride-hailing service sometime in 2019.The company’s surprising performance contrasts with crosstown rival Ford, which saw profits plunge 37 per cent during the quarter to $991 million on falling U.S. and Chinese sales.GM has long talked about reducing costs in preparation for an economic downturn. The company is close to delivering on a promise to reduce structural costs by $6.5 billion annually by year’s end.Retired Chief Financial Officer Chuck Stevens hinted at white-collar cutbacks in April of 2017 when he told analysts that GM is looking for cuts as it simplifies its business after its exit from Europe. Simplification “will allow us to take significant structure out of the business, whether it’s corporate staff, whether it’s engineering staff,” he said.last_img read more

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first_imgSEOUL, Korea, Republic Of — Samsung Electronics has apologized for the sickness and deaths of some of its workers, saying it failed to create a safe working environment at its computer chip and display factories.The announcement by the South Korean technology giant on Friday came weeks after the company and a group representing ailing Samsung workers agreed to accept compensation terms suggested by a mediator and end a highly-publicized standoff that went on for more than a decade.Samsung’s device solutions chief Kinam Kim says the company failed to “sufficiently manage health threats” at its semiconductor and liquid crystal display manufacturing lines.The civic movement against Samsung began in 2007 when taxi driver Hwang Sang-gi refused to accept as settlement after his 23-year-old daughter died of leukemia after working at a Samsung factory.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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first_imgPARIS — The “yellow vests” in France are worrying greens around the world.The worst riots in Paris in decades were sparked by higher fuel taxes, and French President Emmanuel Macron responded by scrapping them Wednesday. But taxes on fossil fuels are just what international climate negotiators, meeting in Poland this week, say are desperately needed to help wean the world off of fossil fuels and slow climate change.“The events of the last few days in Paris have made me regard the challenges as even greater than I thought earlier,” said Stanford University environmental economist Lawrence Goulder, author of the book “Confronting the Climate Challenge.”Economists, policymakers and politicians have long said the best way to fight climate change is to put a higher price on the fuels that acre causing it — gasoline, diesel, coal and natural gas. Taxing fuels and electricity could help pay for the damage they cause, encourage people to use less, and make it easier for cleaner alternatives and fuel-saving technologies to compete.These so-called carbon taxes are expected to be a major part of pushing the world to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and try to prevent runaway climate change that economists say would be far more expensive over the long term than paying more for energy in the short term.But it’s not so easy for people to think about long-term, global problems when they are struggling to get by.Macron said the higher tax was his way of trying to prevent the end of the world. But the yellow vest protesters turned that around with the slogan: “it’s hard to talk about the end of the world while we are talking about the end of the month.”The resistance to the fuel tax is a personal blow to Macron, who sees himself as the guarantor of the 2015 Paris climate accord, its strongest defender on the global stage. He has positioned himself as the anti-Trump when it comes to climate issues.The French government quietly fears a Trump-led backlash against the accord could spread to other major economies whose commitment is essential to keeping the deal together.The fuel tax was not originally Macron’s idea; it dates back to previous administrations. But he vigorously defended it and won the presidency in part on a promise to fight climate change.So what went wrong?Yale University economist William Nordhaus, who won this year’s Nobel prize for economics, said the tax was poorly designed and was delivered by the wrong person. “If you want to make energy taxes unpopular, step one is to be an unpopular leader,” he said. “Step two is to use gasoline taxes and call them carbon taxes. This is hard enough without adding poor design.”Macron, like French presidents before him, made environmental and energy decisions without explaining to the public how important they are and how their lives will change. He’s also seen as the “president of the rich” — his first fiscal decision as president was scrapping a wealth tax. So hiking taxes on gasoline and diesel was seen as especially unfair to the working classes in the provinces who need cars to get to work and whose incomes have stagnated for years.The French government already has programs in place to subsidize drivers who trade in older, dirtier cars for cleaner ones, and expanded them in an attempt to head off the protests last month. But for many French, it was too little, too late.The French reaction to higher fuel prices is hardly unique, which highlights just how hard it can be to discourage fossil fuel consumption by making people pay more. In September, protests in India over high gasoline prices shut down schools and government offices. Protests erupted in Mexico in 2017 after government deregulation caused a spike in gasoline prices, and in Indonesia in 2013 when the government reduced fuel subsidies and prices rose.In the United States, Washington state voters handily defeated a carbon tax in November.“Higher taxes on fuel have always been a policy more popular among economists than among voters,” said Greg Mankiw, a Harvard economist and former adviser to President George W. Bush.Even proponents of carbon taxes acknowledge that they can disproportionally hurt low-income people. Energy costs make up a larger portion of their overall expenses, so a fuel price increase eats up more of their paycheque and leaves them with less to spend. And because energy costs are almost impossible to avoid, they feel trapped.It is also not lost on them that it is the rich, unbothered by fuel taxes, who are hardest on the environment because they travel and consume more.“The mistake of the Macron government was not to marry the increase in fuel taxes with other sufficiently compelling initiatives promising to enhance the welfare and incomes of the ‘yellow vests,’ said Barry Eichengreen, an economist at the University of California, Berkeley.Now the question is “How can we address the climate problem while also avoiding producing political upheaval,” Goulder said.The key is giving a good chunk of money back to the people, Wesleyan University environmental economist Gary Yohe said.Many economists back proposals that would tax carbon, but then use that money to offer tax rebates or credits that would benefit lower-income families.The protests, while sparked by fuel prices, are also about income inequality, populism and anti-elitism, experts say, not just about carbon taxes.“Is it a death knell for the carbon tax or pricing carbon? I don’t think so,” economist Yohe said. “It is just a call for being a little bit more careful about how you design the damn thing.”___AP science writer Seth Borenstein reported from Washington. AP economics writer Christopher Rugaber contributed from Washington and Frank Jordans contributed from Katowice, Poland.___Read more stories on climate issues by The Associated Press at https://www.apnews.com/Climate .___Follow Seth Borenstein on Twitter at @borenbears and Angela Charlton at @acharlton .___The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.Seth Borenstein And Angela Charlton, The Associated Presslast_img read more

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first_imgIndex and currency in this story: (TSX:GSPTSE, TSX:CADUSD=X) The Canadian Press TORONTO — Canada’s main stock index edged higher in late-morning trading, boosted by gains in the energy sector as the price of oil moved higher and the health-care sector which includes the big marijuana stocks.The S&P/TSX composite index was up 6.52 points at 14,433.14.In New York, the Dow Jones industrial average was up 77.96 points at 23,511.12. The S&P 500 index was up 14.89 points at 2,546.83, while the Nasdaq composite was up 61.02 points at 6,799.88.The Canadian dollar traded for 75.14 cents US compared with an average of 74.57 cents US on Friday.The February crude contract was up US$1.68 at US$49.64 per barrel and the February natural gas contract was down eight cents at US$2.96 per mmBTU.The February gold contract was up US$4.80 at US$1,290.60 an ounce and the March copper contract was up 0.50 of a cent at US$2.65 a pound.last_img read more

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first_imgPossession for the purpose of trafficking CocainePossession for the purpose of trafficking MethamphetaminePossession for the purpose of trafficking GabapentinPossession for the purpose of trafficking CodeinePossession of cash obtained by crimeUnauthorised possession of a firearmUnsafe storage of a firearmTwo counts of failure to comply with an undertaking stemming from previous CDSA charges in November 2017Hamelin (BigCharles) remains in custody and is set to appear in High Prairie Provincial Court on March 26th.Cooperation between the RCMP and the public is instrumental to the success of the Crime Reduction efforts. The simple act of reporting any suspicious activity and/or crime provides the necessary information by which the necessary intelligence is gathered. Members of the public who suspect drug or gang activity in their community can call the local police or contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477. HIGH PRAIRIE, AB. – The High Prairie Integrated Drug Unit, High Prairie RCMP and members of the Faust RCMP concluded a two-month long Controlled Drugs and Substances Act investigation last week.According to Cpl. Chris Warren, on March 7th, 2018, the RCMP executed a search warrant at a residence in High Prairie, where they discovered roughly 100 grams of cocaine and 80 grams of methamphetamine prepackaged for sale, cash, a firearm and prescription pills.As a result, fifty-three-year-old Marilyn Gwen Hamelin (BigCharles) has been arrested and charged with multiple offences including:last_img read more

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first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The provincial government announced today that twenty new conservation officers were sworn in today in Victoria before beginning their postings this fall throughout B.C., three of whom will be coming to Northeast B.C.Upon successful completion of training, conservation officers will be based in various locations throughout the province, including several in newly-created positions in Chetwynd and Mackenzie. The remaining officers will be filling vacancies in Fort St. John, Prince George, Quesnel, Terrace, Creston, and the Lower Mainland.The hiring of additional conservation officers will bring the total number of conservation officers around the province to 160. Environment Minister George Heyman also announced that resources are also being added to locations with the highest need. “We recognize the need for additional conservation officers to help protect our natural resources and lessen human-wildlife conflicts. For too long, there has been a lack of frontline conservation officers, and communities have suffered the consequences,” said George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy. “We are taking action to put more boots on the ground, so all British Columbians can benefit from the important work conservation officers do every day.”Conservation officers work on a zone-coverage basis, where officers respond to complaints and concerns anywhere in the zone. The COS considers several factors when determining where any new conservation officers were posted, including officer safety, call volume, zone coverage and geographic location.These new faces will fill existing vacancies, new positions and areas where retirements are imminent. The recruits will start training at the Western Conservation Law Enforcement Academy in May.“More conservation officers on the ground mean more eyes and ears to respond to complaints, and to educate the public, prevent human-wildlife conflicts and protect our natural resources,” said Doug Forsdick, chief conservation officer with the B.C. Conservation Officer Service (COS). “I am proud of the hard work our conservation officers do across the province, and look forward to the latest contingent of new officers serving their communities.”last_img read more

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first_imgThe new curricula for Grades 11 and 12 along with the revised B.C. Graduation Program will be implemented next September. VICTORIA, B.C. – All Grade 10 students in B.C. will officially be learning the Province’s new curriculum for that Grade level this year, marking the second of three steps in which that the new B.C. school curriculum will be implemented.In a press release today, the Ministry of Education announced that the introduction of the Grade 10 curriculum this school year follows the implementation of the new K-9 curriculum in September 2016. Consistent with the K-9 curriculum, the new Grade 10 curriculum also includes Indigenous content and perspectives across all subjects.“Teachers and students are already experiencing the benefits of the personalized, flexible nature of the new curriculum up to Grade 9,” said Rob Fleming, Minister of Education. “The new Grade 10 curriculum offers opportunities for teachers to engage their students in new and innovative ways of learning and to foster creativity. It truly is an exciting time for education in B.C. and I look forward to the positive impact this will have on student success.”last_img read more

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first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. –  A reminder the City’s Annual Christmas Tree pick up is this Saturday, January 5th, 2019.If you are looking for ways to dispose of your real Christmas Tree, Saturday, January 5, 2019, Volunteers will be out collecting trees in city limits all day. The City asks that you have your tree out at your curb in an accessible spot by 8 am.For those that wish to drop of their own tree or require more time, you can do that at the Grounds Building; 9312 – 111 St from January 5-13th, 2019.last_img read more

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first_img“If you go into our schools, of course, you’ll see the orange shirts but also there are several activities that go along with that. So some schools have had assemblies where they’ve talked about the origin and the meaning behind Orange Shirt Day. Our Indigenous Education Centre has been involved with schools and providing resources and activities, such as arts and crafts. So each school celebrates and recognizes it in a different way.”Orange Shirt Day began in 2013 as a result of residential school survivor Phyllis Jack Webstad discussing her experience when she arrived at a residential school. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – September 30 is Orange Shirt Day and schools across School District 60 are taking part in this annual campaign.Starting back in 2013, School District 60 Superintendent, Stephen Petrucci, says Orange Shirt Day is an annual campaign to raise awareness that “Every Child Matters” and to remember the terrible effects of the residential school system as part of the Reconciliation Process.According to Petrucci, not only are students and staff across the District wearing orange shirts, some schools are even holding activities to honour this day such as assemblies and Indigenous arts and crafts.last_img read more

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first_imgNew Delhi: The central government has approved a five-fold increase in one-time incentive given to its employees who acquire higher degrees while serving in their departments, officials said Monday. The amount of incentive will be increased from a minimum of Rs 10,000 to a maximum of Rs 30,000 for acquiring higher qualifications like Ph.D, they said. The Personnel Ministry has amended a 20-year-old norm in this regard to increase the amount of incentives provided for the employees. The government employees acquiring fresh higher qualifications after coming into service were granted incentive in the form of one-time lump-sum amount ranging from Rs 2,000 to Rs 10,000. Now, it has been decided to increase the amount to a minimum of Rs 10,000 to a maximum of Rs 30,000, an order recently issued by the Personnel Ministry stated. While Rs 10,000 will be given for acquiring degree/diploma of duration of three years or less, Rs 15,000 will be given for acquiring degree/diploma having duration of more than three years, it said. A sum of Rs 20,000 will be given for earning post graduate degree/diploma with one year or less. Such qualification having duration of more than one year will get Rs 25,000 to the employees, the new order stated. A highest incentive of Rs 30,000 will be given to those getting Ph.D or equivalent, it stated. There are around 48.41 lakh central government employees. “No incentive shall be allowed for acquiring higher qualification purely on academic or literary subjects,” it clarified. The acquisition of the qualification should be directly related to the functions of the post held by him/her, or to the functions to be performed in the next higher post, the ministry said. “There should be direct nexus between the functions of the post and the qualification acquired and that it should contribute to the efficiency of the government servant,” it said. The incentive, however, shall not be admissible where the employee is sponsored by the government or he/she avails study leave for acquiring the qualification, the order stated. “The incentive would be given only for higher qualification acquired after induction into service,” it stated. Further, the incentive shall be limited to maximum two times in an employee’s career, with a minimum gap of two years between successive grants, the ministry said. According to Personnel Ministry’s order issued in April 1999, employees were entitled for a minimum of Rs 2,000 and maximum of Rs 10,000 for getting fresh qualifications. While Rs 2,000 was applicable incentive for “passing intermediate examination”, those earning post graduate degree of Ph.D were entitled for a maximum of Rs 10,000.last_img read more

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first_imgBeating Delhi’s heat wave by wrapping his head and face with a white towel Shiv Kiran stood near gate number seven of Rajiv Chowk metro station to distribute pamphlets of a political party for the upcoming parliamentary election. His target of the day was to finish the distribution of about 300 pamphlets for Rs 100. “Now we do not earn much money in distributing political pamphlets unlike earlier when we used to earn around Rs 300 per day by doing the same since political parties now focus on mobile phone-based campaigns more,” says Shiv. He narrates the story of his father who was a master in making political graffiti on the walls for campaigns in Uttar Pradesh. “Now the focus has shifted from such campaign strategy to videos and social media,” apprises Shiv. With the election around the corner, stories of political campaigns in India are witnessing a change of strategy which commenced from the 2014 election itself. Now, modern campaigning has taken over. Months before the election, most of the major political parties in India launched their party’s theme-based music videos. These videos are being played all over social media platforms and televisions as advertisements. The theme songs are regularly played on the radio as well. Political parties made these videos with the help of notable lyricists, composers and singers. The list includes Javed Akhtar and Prasoon Joshi among others. Some of the political parties even have two different music videos targetting different voter base. Congress & BJP’s Music Videos On the second weekend of April, BJP and Congress launched their theme songs for the election campaign presenting a contrasting picture. While Congress focused on political economy with basic minimum income and justice for all, BJP had its “Modi-versus-All” pitch with more than a dash of hyper-nationalism. Ab Hoga Nyay (There will be justice now), Congress’s rap-style theme song penned by lyricist Javed Akhtar, is based on the party’s famed Nyuntam Aay Yojna (NYAY). “In the theme song, we wanted to focus on the issue of justice because that is the need of the hour. Similarly, we have portrayed the faith and believe on plurality and diversity of India through the song,” Aishwarya Mahadev, national media panelist for Congress tells Millennium Post. Mahadev explains that the party wanted to bring the concept of diverse India at the forefront and not concentrate on the face of its president Rahul Gandhi. “We all know PM Narendra Modi made a lot of promises in the last election but did not fulfil anything moreover he and his party attacked the idea of India as a whole. To shift the focus from the real issue they have only focused on communal politics, caste atrocities and now on Pakistan,” she says. On the other hand, BJP theme song “Phir ek baar Modi Sarkaar” (Modi government once more), penned by Censor Board chief Prasoon Joshi, revolves around Modi’s five-year performance – with a special thrust on national security, honesty, ability to take big decisions – besides targeting the Opposition for its alleged lack of cohesiveness. The poor, middle class and neo-middle class will be at the centre of BJP’s electioneering, party leaders said and took a swipe at Congress for “not even saying a word” on the emerging middle class when it launched its manifesto. A senior BJP leader says, “Our song is all about the PM because India wants and believes in only one face and that is him. The people know how much he has worked in these last five year for the people hence we have talked about all the scheme he has made. We will fight this election in his name and we do not believe when his face with us the BJP needs anything else. Congress talked about all their lies and the false narrative they want to create but people will not believe in those lies anymore.” Regional Parties The regional parties have been an important part of Indian politics and analysts opine that they will play a major role in making the Prime Minister in the ongoing election. In every state, there have been waves of alliances. While in some states these alliances materialised, it did not go down well in others. But these regional political parties are certainly not less active on social media or lagging behind when it comes to campaign theme songs. The Telegu Desam Party of Andhra Pradesh led by CM Chandra Babu Naidu has come up with a song named ‘Sila Mose Gaayale’. The song draws a parallel between a stone and Naidu to describe how the leader has to undergo much hewing before being carved into a fine statue and how the wounds left behind, thus, have reduced people to tears. Naidu has always talked about a ‘behind-the-door’ association of PM Modi, K Chandrasekhar Rao and YS Jaganmohan Reddy and accused them of hatching a conspiracy against Andhra Pradesh. TDP has come out with a musical rendition of Naidu’s own trials and tribulations because of the “conspiring trio” through a campaign song. Similarly, his opponent Jaganmohan Reddy has a campaign song, ‘Ravali Jagan Kavali Jagan’. The line “Jagan is coming, we want Jagan” sounds like a marching song as it highlights the year-long padayatra by Reddy prior to his election campaign. Another major regional party, Trinamool Congress has also come out with an official campaign song for the 2019 Lok Sabha elections. The song titled ‘Ma, Mati, Manush’ was released by party supremo Mamata Banerjee on her social media account. TMC campaign song is sung by Somlata Acharya and Rupam Islam. The two and a half minute video song talks of the achievements of TMC government in West Bengal. While Bengal’s composite culture and communal harmony is the main theme, the song also targets “riot mongers”. Makers’ Voice Arjun Harjai is a Mumbai-based composer and is a popular figure in the advertisement world. He has created many jingles for companies such as Amazon, Google and Suzuki among others. Harjai created Congress’s song based on Javed Akhtar’s lyrics. “I kept that idea in my mind and approached it with that sort of soundscape, something that’s catchy and will leave an impact. The idea was for every common person to feel that he/she represents Hindustan,” says Harjai, about the song directed by Nikhil Advani. A drum and bass piece, it has the lines Tum jhoothi chaalen chal ke, shehron ke naam badal ke, noto ko kachra kar ke… Ab dhokha nahi khayenge, Congress sarkar layenge,” he was quoted in a media interview. Similarly, Delhi-based Ankita Singh wrote a song titled Modi Once More, which speaks of bringing Modi back along with synth, drums and rhythmic claps. ‘Har qadam ab saath badhaana hai, Saath Namo ke hum sabko aana hai/ Safety ki baat aati baar baar, Humko safe rakhe Army aur sarkaar’, sung by Sharvi Yadav and composed by composer Anurag Chauhan. This song is not the theme music video of BJP but it is a song which the party has come out with to target the youth. From wall graffiti to advertisements on autos to the social media buzz with music videos, political campaigning in India is becoming more colourful each time. The campaigns across the spectrum are technically aimed at the youth because it is the youth who will make the future and the parties recognise this well. But between colours and rhythms, the politics which earlier had a human touch – one-to-one engagement and dialogue – is now missing from the environment. It is now more power, colour and superficial.last_img read more

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